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Changes to the NDSS for health professionals

Updated 15 June 2020

Practice nurses and signing/certifying some NDSS forms

From 1 August 2020, practice nurses (enrolled and registered nurses) are authorised to complete and sign/certify some NDSS forms.

This business process is optional for each GP or medical practitioner / clinic, and a practice nurse would not be required to certify a form unless it is within their scope of practice, knowledge and experience to do so.

Read more about practice nurses and NDSS forms.

Changes to the delivery of continuous glucose monitoring starter kits during COVID-19

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic the Australian Government has introduced a temporary change to the Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) Initiative to enable a CGM starter kit to be sent directly to the residential address of the person with diabetes or their carer/guardian. This may be appropriate when access to a face-to-face opportunity for the health professional to provide education and support for the setup and ongoing use of the CGM device is unavailable.

A Continuous and Flash Glucose Monitoring Access form must have been completed, and an Addendum for home delivery of CGM starter kits must be filled in by the certifying health professional to allow this to happen.

If a health professional, in consultation with a person with diabetes, or their carer/guardian, has determined that the starter kit should be delivered to the person with diabetes’ residential address (for the purpose of a telehealth consultation), please ensure that:

  • all personal information including name, address and phone number are correct as these details will be provided to the CGM product’s supplier to enable the delivery of the starter kit
  • the person or their carer/guardian is aware that a starter kit will not be left at a residential address unless a signature is obtained upon delivery; and
  • a follow-up appointment (via telehealth) has been made to provide education and support for the setup and ongoing use of the device and the person has been advised not to use the device prior to this telehealth consultation.

Before the follow-up appointment, the health professional should ensure the person with diabetes has received their CGM starter kit.

Steps to assist with delivery of CGM starter kits

Please find below the step-by-step process for CGM device starter kits being sent to person with diabetes.

  1. Health professional conducts an appointment with the person with diabetes (in person, or via telehealth) to select the most clinically appropriate CGM device for management of their diabetes.
  2. The health professional fills in the appropriate Continuous and Flash Glucose Monitoring Access form, including the section of the form with details about the person with diabetes (on behalf of the person with diabetes). The health professional needs to ensure up-to-date details are provided for the person with diabetes including an email address and preferred phone number.
  3. When a CGM starter kit is required, the health professional is to consider the following when nominating the delivery address to be used:
    1. The health professional’s regular place of work (no change to current process).
    2. Alternate clinical location (no change to current process).
      On the Continuous and Flash Glucose Monitoring Access form the health professional fills in the address the starter kit is to be sent to under contact details for the health professional—including email and preferred phone number—receiving the CGM starter kit.
    3. Person with diabetes’ residential address (change to current process is set out in steps 5-10 below).
      CGM starter kits will only be sent to a residential address if the follow-up appointment to initiate the device is via telehealth. Starter kits will not be left at a residential address unless a signature is obtained upon delivery.
  4. Continuous and Flash Glucose Monitoring Access form is submitted for processing as per details on the form.

Steps 5-10 are only needed if the follow-up appointment to initiate the device is conducted by telehealth and the CGM starter kit is being sent directly to the person with diabetes’ residential address.

  1. If a decision has been made by the health professional to send a starter kit directly to the person with diabetes’ residential address, the health professional needs to advise the person:
    1. how the follow-up appointment (via telehealth) will be conducted to initiate optimal use of the device
    2. that they will need suitable internet access to upload and download data and to conduct the telehealth consultation
    3. the starter kit will be delivered to the person’s residential address; and
    4. that they should not open the starter kit contents until the appointment.
  1. In addition to the CGM Initiative Access form, the CGM Addendum must also be completed by the health professional and sent for processing.
  2. CGM Assessment and Addendum are processed, with the NDSS issuing communication to the person with diabetes and the health professional.
  3. CGM starter kit is sent to the person with diabetes’ residential address as indicated on the completed Continuous and Flash Glucose Monitoring Access form and Addendum.
  4. CGM starter kit is received by the person with diabetes.
  5. The health professional and the person with diabetes must conduct a telehealth consultation to provide education and support for the setup and ongoing use of the device.

Here is a printable version of the Steps to assist with delivery of CGM starter kits.

Further information

If you have any questions that we can assist with, please contact the NDSS Helpline on 1800 637 700 or ndss@diabetesaustralia.com.au for assistance.


Changes to NDSS gestational diabetes registration during COVID-19

During the COVID-19 pandemic, there will be temporary changes to the NDSS gestational diabetes registration process, and the communications provided from the National Gestational Diabetes Register to women registered with the NDSS and their general practitioners.

Women who have been recently diagnosed with gestational diabetes for the first time can be registered with the NDSS without the need for them to co-sign the Registration form.

Women who are pregnant now and have had gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy can be registered with the NDSS without the need for a diagnostic test.

Read here: NDSS gestational diabetes registration and changes during COVID-19 pandemic.


Making it easier to register your patients with the NDSS and complete forms during social distancing

GPs and other health professionals will be able to complete NDSS registration and other forms without the need for co-signing by the person with diabetes. This temporary change includes the NDSS Registration form. This will make it easier to register people with diabetes on the NDSS when conducting telehealth consultations. By ensuring all people with diabetes are registered with the NDSS, you will enable them to access high-quality diabetes information, resources and support services during this challenging time as well as providing access to subsidised diabetes products including glucose monitoring and insulin delivery devices.

All NDSS forms are available at ndss.com.au/forms.

Read the news article about the Signing of NDSS forms—temporary change.


Previous announcements

24 February 2020
Changes to CGM Initiative from 1 March 2020

9 November 2018
Changes to some NDSS products from 1 December 2018